Share
Get RED-Y for the ride of your life!

Fun, yet practical. Inexpensive, yet priceless. There really is nothing quite like riding a motorcycle. Fortunately, becoming a motorcyclist isn’t difficult at all - and Honda is here to help you get started. Simply follow the three steps outlined on this page and you'll be 'up-to-speed' in no time on licensing requirements, choosing the right bike, preparing for your ride and more. Red-Y to ride? Let’s get going...

The requirements for obtaining your motorcycle operator’s licence typically involve a series of graduated steps before you’re able to ride any size of bike with no restrictions (such as staying off highways or not riding at night).

Signing up for a certified rider-training course makes it easier to navigate through the process, and they even provide the bike for you to learn on.

Provincial License Requirements

The licensing requirements vary for each Canadian province. To find out what you need for where you live, as well as a handy list of local, Honda Canada approved training schools, simply click on the appropriate province or territory.

Finding a Training School

Honda has selected some of the best training schools around to help you gain the skills and confidence required to successfully obtain your motorcycle license.

Alberta Graduated Motorcycle Licensing

The details surrounding Alberta's Graduated Licensing Requirements for Motorcyclists can be found by following this link to the province of Alberta's website.

See Honda selected training schools in Alberta
British Columbia Graduated Motorcycle Licensing

The details surrounding British Columbia's Graduated Licensing Requirements for Motorcyclists can be found by following this link to the province of British Columbia's website.

See Honda selected training schools in British Columbia
Manitoba Graduated Motorcycle Licensing

The details surrounding Manitoba's Graduated Licensing Requirements for Motorcyclists can be found by following this link to the province of Manitoba's website.

See Honda selected training schools in Manitoba
New Brunswick Graduated Motorcycle Licensing

The details surrounding New Brunswick's Graduated Licensing Requirements for Motorcyclists can be found by following this link to the province of New Brunswick's website.

See Honda selected training schools in New Brunswick
Newfoundland & Labrador Graduated Motorcycle Licensing

The details surrounding Newfoundland & Labrador's Graduated Licensing Requirements for Motorcyclists can be found by following this link to the province of Newfoundland & Labrador's website.

See Honda selected training schools in Newfoundland & Labrador
Nova Scotia Graduated Motorcycle Licensing

The details surrounding Nova Scotia's Graduated Licensing Requirements for Motorcyclists can be found by following this link to the province of Nova Scotia's website.

See Honda selected training schools in Nova Scotia
Northwest Territories Graduated Motorcycle Licensing

The details surrounding Northwest Territories's Graduated Licensing Requirements for Motorcyclists can be found by following this link to the province of Northwest Territories's website.

See Honda selected training schools in Northwest Territories
Nunavut Graduated Motorcycle Licensing

The details surrounding Nunavut's Graduated Licensing Requirements for Motorcyclists can be found by following this link to the province of Nunavut's website.

See Honda selected training schools in Nunavut
Ontario Graduated Motorcycle Licensing

The details surrounding Ontario's Graduated Licensing Requirements for Motorcyclists can be found by following this link to the province of Ontario's website.

See Honda selected training schools in Ontario
Prince Edward Island Graduated Motorcycle Licensing

The details surrounding Prince Edward Island's Graduated Licensing Requirements for Motorcyclists can be found by following this link to the province of Prince Edward Island's website.

See Honda selected training schools in Prince Edward Island
Quebec Graduated Motorcycle Licensing

The details surrounding Quebec's Graduated Licensing Requirements for Motorcyclists can be found by following this link to the province of Quebec's website.

See Honda selected training schools in Quebec
Saskatchewan Graduated Motorcycle Licensing

The details surrounding Saskatchewan 's Graduated Licensing Requirements for Motorcyclists can be found by following this link to the province of Saskatchewan 's website.

See Honda selected training schools in Saskatchewan
Yukon Graduated Motorcycle Licensing

The details surrounding Yukon's Graduated Licensing Requirements for Motorcyclists can be found by following this link to the province of Yukon's website.

See Honda selected training schools in Yukon
NS NB PE NU YT NT NL QC ON MB SK AB BC Created with Raphaël 2.0.0
Learn What To Look For

Riding a motorcycle is a whole lot of fun, and so is shopping for your first bike. Sure, it can seem overwhelming at first, with so many different models to choose from, but once you learn a little bit about how one style of bike differs from another, it’ll be easy to find the bike that’s just right for you. Here are a few of the important things to look for in your first bike:

Seat Height
Seat Height Being able to put both of your feet flat on the ground when you come to a stop gives you extra control and confidence. And if the seat is too high, the bike can feel intimidating to ride – particularly if you’re just learning. Street bikes typically have a lower seat height than off-road or dual-sport bikes, in part because they need less ground clearance.
Bodywork Style
Bodywork Style Want to learn more about getting started in motorcycling? Want to try out a Honda motorcycle? Want to test your skills at a fun Honda-sponsored event?
Seating Position
Seating Position A bike’s ergonomics – how your arms and legs are positioned and the angle of your back and neck when you’re riding – plays a huge role in ride comfort, how easy the bike is to handle and how confident you feel. The seating position may seem just right at a standstill, but awkward once you start riding. For your first bike, look for something that puts you in a gentle crouch – not too leaned forward with too much stress on your arms - and not too leaned back with your feet too forward.
Engine Size
Engine Size Along with displacement, the number of cylinders an engine has contributes to how it performs, how it feels, how it sounds, how much it weighs – even how it looks.

Smaller bikes aimed at new riders typically have one or two cylinders to keep weight low and the bike narrow. Cruisers usually have two-cylinder engines, often with a classic V-twin shape, and high-performance sportbikes and touring bikes almost always have four, or even six, cylinders.

Riders often fall in love with the sound and feel of a particular type of engine – all are capable of great performance, so it often comes down to what you prefer.
Weight
Weight A lighter bike is simply easier to keep balanced when you’re stopped, or when you’re tip-toeing into a tight parking spot. It’s also easier to move around in a garage or put it on or take it off its sidestand or centrestand. In most cases, the bigger the engine, the heavier the bike. Honda weights always include a full tank of gas, so you know exactly the weight of the bike at its heaviest. Not all companies do this.
Brakes
Brakes Braking on a motorcycle is a lot like braking on a bicycle – it takes a little bit of practice to do it properly and safely without skidding the tires. That’s why Honda leads the way with technology designed to make braking a whole lot easier to master and safer to use. Especially when you’re just starting out, a bike with ABS (Anti-lock Braking System) is a great choice because ABS helps to prevent the wheels from locking and skidding if you brake too hard or on a slippery surface. An ABS system that links or combines the front and rear brakes is even better – it automatically applies some braking force to the front wheel when the rear-brake pedal is applied, and (depending on the type of linked system) some force to the rear wheel when the front-brake lever is applied.
Choose Your Bike Style

We know the importance of getting a safe, confident, enjoyable start in the sport, which is why Honda leads the way in offering a wide selection of bikes designed with novice riders in mind. Here’s a look at the seven basic styles of bike and what they offer.

Choose Your Gear

Once you’ve chosen your ride, the next step is to shop for some cool riding gear. You’ll need a helmet, of course – either full-face or open-face style depending in part on the type of bike you’ll be riding. And don’t forget eye protection, a proper motorcycle jacket made of leather or abrasion-resistant fabric, and sturdy gloves and footwear. Full leather suits, rain and cold-weather gear, abrasion-resistant pants, special off-road clothing... your local Honda dealership has it all, plus the expertise to make sure everything fits you right.

Choose Your Gear
HELMET

Your helmet is without question the most important piece of protection. It must fasten securely and bear DOT and/or Snell approval labels. Full-face helmets are strongly recommended over open face styles for improved comfort and protection. Make sure your helmet visor is high quality, shatter proof Lexan®.

JACKET

Jackets provide excellent protection from the elements and act as the first line of defence in a fall. Correct fit and armour placement are extremely important. Make sure the jacket you use allows for proper adjustment. Jackets are usually made from leather, textile, mesh or combinations of the three. The benefit of leather is increased protection, while textile & mesh offer increased practicality.

PANTS

In a fall your knees, hips, or legs are often the first things to contact the ground. For safety from the waist down you need both abrasion and impact protection in your pants. As with all other apparel, it is extremely important that armour not move freely. Make sure your pants include padding on the hips.

GLOVES

A good pair of riding gloves not only protects your hands in the event of a fall, but also helps keep them from getting sore or tired. You’ll know you have the right size when you can make a fist without difficulty and they fit snuggly without causing discomfort. Leather construction with a plastic knuckle is recommended.

BOOTS

Quality footwear with good ankle protection is a must. Some boots can be quite dangerous because of the sole. Make sure yours do not have deep grooves that can hang up on the pegs easily. Boots with plastic panels are recommended because they tend to slide, rather than tumble when hitting the pavement.

SUIT

The most abrasion and impact protection possible is available only with the use of a well armoured, one-piece leather suit. Correct fit is more important than anything. All armour should fit snuggly in place and the leather should not move freely or fold over your skin.

SPINE PROTECTOR

Most jackets and suits come with a supplemental spine pad, but these offer a minimal amount of spine protection. CE rated spine protectors improve the level of protection as well as cover a larger portion of the back. Your CE rated spine protector should be fully adjustable at the waist and shoulders to maximize safety.

HELMET

Your helmet is without question the most important piece of protection. It must fasten securely, and bear DOT, and/or Snell approval labels. Full-face helmets are recommended over openface styles for their improved protection.

GOGGLES

Protecting your eyes is just as important as protecting your noggin, so goggles are a must when heading out on the trail. Make sure they fit inside your helmet opening, and opt for higher-quality models with a foam seal and shatterproof clear or tinted Lexan® lenses.

JERSEY

Long-sleeved jerseys provide excellent protection from scrapes and cuts, and they keep a rider comfortable over a wide range of weather conditions. Most riding jerseys are made of materials that breathes well and stretches with normal body movements.

ELBOW GUARDS

Further protection for your elbows and forearms comes in the form of hard-plastic, foam-lined elbow pads, worn underneath your jersey. These come in specific child and adult sizes, so make sure they fit snugly and won’t slip in the event of a fall.

GLOVES

A good pair of riding gloves not only protects your hands in the event of a fall, but also helps keep them from getting sore, tired or cold out on the trail. You’ll know you have the right size when you can make a fist without difficulty, and they fit snugly without causing discomfort.

PANTS

Riding pants, usually made of tough, lightweight nylon with stretch panels in key areas to ensure a secure fit, are another essential item. Choose pants that fit comfortably but allow ample room to accommodate knee protection (guards) underneath.

KNEE/SHIN GUARDS

Leg armor is key to protecting your knees and shins from bumps and bruises, so use the same principle for knee/shin guards as you did for the elbow guards: Look for specific youth or adult sizes, and be sure they fit snugly and provide complete shin and knee coverage

BOOTS

There’s no shortage of great boots on the market offering superb protection. Look for models with adjustable, quick-release buckles (for easy entry/exit), steel-shank- supported soles (to protect your foot’s arch), and a combination leather/plastic construction for optimal cushioning and comfort.

CHEST PROTECTOR

Chest protectors help shield your chest, shoulders and back against trail 'roost' kicked up by other riders. Available in a wide range of sizes - be sure to pick one that fits securely and comfortably.

KIDNEY BELT

While not usually considered a mandatory piece of protective gear, kidney belts are still highly recommended. Designed for both lower back and kidney support while navigating rough terrain, it’s the smart choice to wear one every time you ride.

Things to know before you go

You passed your licensing test with flying colours. You learned all about the different types of bikes, and found the perfect one for you. Now the fun really begins! Before heading out on your first ride – in fact, before any time you ride - here are a few things to remember.

Take Care of the Unexpected

Before each ride, it’s important to inspect your motorcycle and make sure any problem you find is corrected. A careful pre-ride inspection and good maintenance are especially important, not only for safety, but because having a breakdown, or even a flat tire, can be a major inconvenience.

Preparing for a Ride

A safe and enjoyable ride begins with good planning and preparation. Always ride with at least one other person in case you have trouble, and let someone know where you’re going and when you expect to return. Before riding, take time to get acquainted with your motorcycle and how it works. To protect your investment, we urge you to take responsibility for keeping your motorcycle well maintained. Scheduled service is a must, of course, but it’s just as important to observe break-in guidelines and perform all pre-ride and other periodic checks detailed in your owner’s manual. We also recommend that you read your owner’s manual before you ride – it’s full of facts, instructions, safety information and helpful tips.

What to Take with You

What you take with you during a ride depends on how long you expect to ride, how far you might go and how experienced you or your companions are. We recommend that you always take water, a snack, a first aid kit and your owner’s manual. How much weight you put on your motorcycle, and how you load it, are important to your safety. Improperly loading your motorcycle can affect its stability and handling. Any time you ride with a passenger or cargo, you should adhere to the guidelines and other information in your owner’s manual. The weight of added accessories will reduce the maximum cargo weight you can carry. If you require more information on the cargo you can carry on your motorcycle, speak to your Honda dealer.

Pre-ride Inspection

For your safety, it is very important to take a few moments before each ride to walk around your motorcycle and check its condition. If you detect any problem; be sure you take care of it, or have it corrected by your Honda dealer.

Check the levels of engine oil, fuel and coolant, and look for any leaks.

Check the operation of the front and rear brakes and make sure there is no brake fluid leakage.

Check the condition and the pressure of the tires.

Check the condition and amount of slack in the drive chain.

Check the throttle for smooth opening and full closing in all steering positions.

Check that the headlight, tail/brake light, turn signals, and horn function properly.

Check that the engine stop switch works properly.

Check that the engine shuts off when the sidestand is deployed.

For more information, refer to your owner’s manual and speak to your local Honda dealer.

Honda Riding Events

Want to learn more about getting started in motorcycling? Want to try out a Honda motorcycle? Want to test your skills at a fun Honda-sponsored event?

Explore Honda Riding Events